Lent

Noel Sales Barcelona
2 min readFeb 20, 2024

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Last February 14th, the entire Catholic Church opened the Lenten season — the 40 days of preparation for the celebration of the Resurrection of Christ on Easter Sunday.

In the predominantly Catholic Philippines, Lent is a season to show popular piety while attempting to follow the teachings of the Church regarding the occasion. Every faithful is expected to pray, do penance, and give money to charity. In other words, Lent is a means to relearn the basic tenets of the religion allegedly founded by Jesus Christ more than 2,000 years ago.

Lent is also a season for the local Catholic traditions like the Pabasa, Senakulo, and the series of processions, particularly during the Semana Santa or Holy Week. It is when the camareros (the ones who maintain and take care of sacred images) invest so much money in the vestments of their sacred images, the flowers, and other accessories for their carrozas. For them, it is their way of showing their “devotion” and “sacrifice” during this holy season.

For those who are outside the Church and never had the time to delve deeply into the symbolism and importance of these devotions and sacred traditions in the faith of a Catholic man or woman, they tend to dismiss it as mere superstition, or worse, a form of idolatry and paganistic worship.

On the other hand, Lent is the season that unfolds the sacred mystery of the Salvation History — the grand plan of Yahweh, the God of the entire universe to save mankind from the curse of sin.

Personally, I find Lent as a chance to rekindle my faith as a Catholic. As I ponder on the life, Passion, death, and resurrection of Christ, I see the stages of my own spiritual “evolution” as a human being.

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Noel Sales Barcelona

A former freelance journalist, art and cultural critic, and an intuitive from the Philippines. I am the new species of weirdness.